Category Archives: 1. UARTS

MMDI 202 02: WDS HTML Basics – 09/08/14

INTRO:
Email me: jparada@uarts.edu, please.
If you want to turn your work in using DropBox, make sure you have an account and email me.
Review HW.

READING:
HTML is a hierarchy.
HTML provides structure
Chapter 1 – Summary
Chapter 2, all the tags
Another example
Chapter 2 – Summary

PROCESS
What process? Why do we need it?
the bad, worse, just plain ugly
All kinds of “bad”

Studio 02: HTML
Review 1, 2
Read: Chapter 18 – Process and Design
Add more structural and semantic HTML to your pages. Try all new HTML introduced in Chapters 1 and 2

MMDI 202 Web Design Studio Fall 2014

Lecture/Studio: Monday 8:30AM – 11:50AM/ 1:00PM – 3:50PM
Room: Terra 1213
Prof. Juan M. Parada (e: jparada@uarts.edu)
Office: Terra 1211B – By appointment only
PDF Copy

INTRODUCTION
Increasingly, the Web is becoming the de facto medium for communicating and networking with
others, sharing and accessing information and knowledge, doing business, and engaging the
world. This studio course focuses on the creation of web sites through the concepts and practical application of interactivity. Comprised of readings and group discussions, short assignments, and long-term projects, individual creativity and iterative design are stressed as well as the understanding and use of the Web as an interactive platform in the communication of ideas. Both collaborative and individual exercises will be assigned.

Web Design Studio will equip students with the skills to quickly create a web-presence. They will learn to leverage existing technologies, services, and frameworks to get the most from today’s maturing Internet. By balancing online existing services and learning the basics to hand-code a website, students will gain a broad understanding of the language of the Internet, Web Design and the Dynamic Web. Students will apply the knowledge they gain by creating a personal website, then adapting their site to suit a mobile audience.

The class web site is the official source for all dates and assignments; the syllabus is
NOT. The syllabus provides a general overview and guidelines for the course. The web site is a
living, dynamic document.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES
-Set up a local web development environment
-Understand contemporary web standards, accessibility guidelines, and semantic web development using CSS and XHTML.
-Develop a knowledge of available web services/APIs and content management systems, be able to leverage their use for web projects (WordPress)
-Practice an iterative design methodology alongside project management techniques (both individually and through group work).
-Design and build a functional website and deploy it to the Internet
-Understand mobile web browsing and adapt your website to work with mobile devices

REQUIREMENTS
-Attendance and full participation are extremely important in getting the most out of this class.
-You are required to back up your files. If your computer is wiped clean by Academic Computing and you lose your course work it will affect your grade.
-Active learning involves engaging in the subject matter, class discussions, and projects, and will be significant in determining your grade.
-Completion of all assigned projects and readings by their due dates (expect between 6 – 12 hours per week of outside class work).
-Students must use and frequently check their uarts.edu email addresses. Important communication outside of class will be directed to this account.
-Analog media: notebook/sketchbook and pens, markers, pencils, etc.

SOFTWARE:
• HTML Text Editor
• Mac: skEdit, BBEdit, Coda, TextMate PC: TextPad, jEdit, PSPad, TextMate
• FTP App
Mac: Transmit, Fetch PC: WS_FTP, SmartFTP or – Firefox add-on: FireFTP (https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/684)

Web Hosting & Domain Name
Students must acquire their own web hosting account and domain for posting their projects.
Hosting accounts must have PHP and MySQL enabled. Students may choose to share hosting
accounts as most allow for hosting multiple domains under a single account. Recommended
web hosting companies include: Site5, ServerGrove, Media Temple.

Assignments
More narrowly focused assignments, exercises, and presentations will be given in order to
sharpen studentsʼ skills in project management, interface design, user experience design,
information design, HTML/CSS programming, and CMS usage.
The Studio section of the class (Wednesday 01:00PM – 03:50PM) will provide students with the opportunity to put the morning lectures into progress and thus is extremely important.

Your Own Custom Blog
You will deploy and customize your own WordPress blog. Here, you will eventually post all your assignments, notes, questions, etc. At the end of the semester, I must be able to find all your work here.

Final Project
Students build a personal website (blog, portfolio, business, etc.) that demonstrates
understanding of all concepts covered over the first half of the semester.

Mobilize Personal Website
Students will develop a mobile version of a website. They will learn the current best practices, creating a site that degrades gracefully to work on the widest range of mobile handsets.

Final Documentation
All web-based projects completed during this course are required to be hosted and live at
students’ web domains. Additionally, students will maintain a class wiki containing all of your
work from the course: research, inspiration, process diagrams, schematics, design iterations, screenshots, code snippets, and more. Specific requirements will be given at a later date. Additionally, all project files must be submitted along with the final project.

EVALUATION & GRADING
• All work assigned will be completed and delivered on the due date, otherwise you will
receive a failing grade for that assignment. In other words, late work will not be
accepted. All work must be turned in at the beginning of class or it will be considered late.
• Makeup assignments are only available when discussed with and approved by the
instructor in advance of the due date.
• Each student will be judged on the application of the ideas and concepts introduced during
the course. Incomplete or unsatisfactory work will receive a failing grade.
Your final grade will be based upon a combination of qualitative and quantitative evaluation of
your performance:

1. Short-term Assignments – Studio work = 30%
2. WordPress setup and customization = 30%
3. Final Project (Mobile Website, Final Documentation) = 40%

As well as a qualitative evaluation:
• A – Excellent
Performance and attendance of the student has been of the highest level, showing
sustained excellence in meeting course responsibilities.
• B – Very Good / Good
Performance and attendance of the student has been good, though not of the highest level.
• C – Satisfactory / Average
Performance and attendance of the student has been adequate, satisfactorily meeting the
course requirements.
• D – Poor / Below Average
Performance and attendance of the student has been less than adequate.
• F – Unacceptable
Performance and attendance of the student has been such that course requirements have
not been met.

ATTENDANCE POLICY
• Unexcused absences will affect your grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of
every class. Since there is so much technical, conceptual, and design information to
absorb, regular attendance is essential. Contact me in advance if you will not be
in class (in person or by email is preferred and not AFTER the fact).
• One absence is allowed; after that, your grade will drop. This is a weekly, six hour production class. Be on time.

TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM
Laptop computers and other mobile devices are invaluable tools for artists, designers, and
students when used responsibly. However, this technology can also be incredibly distracting,
especially in the classroom. When in class, you may use your laptops and other devices for any
activities pertaining to the course: taking notes, researching material relevant to our readings
and discussions, making class presentations, etc. As a general rule, the following uses are
unacceptable: checking e-mail (unless you are sending me an assignment or question), instant messaging, texting, using Facebook, YouTube, or other social networking sites.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
All work for this class must be your own and specific to this semester. Plagiarism, that is, knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as oneʼs own work in any academic exercise, is absolutely unacceptable. Any student who commits plagiarism must re-do the assignment for a grade no higher than a D. In fact, a D is the highest
possible course grade for any student who commits plagiarism. Also, incidents of plagiarism
will be reported to the Dean of Students for further disciplinary action. Please contact me with
any specific questions about citing and documenting source material.

ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Any student eligible for and requesting academic accommodations due to a disability should
provide an Accommodation Form from Disability Services within the first two weeks of the
semester. Disability Services is located at Gershman YM/WHA, room 306. Contact Neila
Douglas, Director of Disability Services at 215-717-6616 or ndouglas@uarts.edu for more
information.

MMDI 202 01: WDS Introduction – 08/25/14

Book: HTML and CSS: Design and Build Websites. John Wiley & Sons. 2011.

Software:
Editors – BBEdit, TextWrangler
FTP

Read This:
separate but equal?
The world has changed
We all need a process – but none are set in stone
The importance of layout

Links:
Hosting
Free FTP
Webmonkey
CSS Schools
Stacks

Intro to HTML:
W3

Assignment:
Read Chapter 1, Chapter 2

Studio 01: Set up and Intro to HTML
Read the articles above.
Buy a domain name and server space (hosting)
Create a splash page for your web site (use anything you want) Example?
– Use HTML and images.
– Create links to multiple pages both internal and external (what does this mean?)
– Create a link to your email address for contact

CE 2411 08: HTML5 – 07/28/14

INTRO:
Review Final Interface design
Due: FINAL WEB SITE (08/06)
HW Deliverables for final:
BASIC HTML
– Create a Basic splash page with images, links, and headings.
– Add more structural and semantic HTML to your pages.

PLANNING:
– 1-2 page proposal For Final Website. Discuss limitations and example sites.
– Create Site Maps
– Create wireframes
– Build out your Site prototype using your final wire frames.
– Create Interface Design, (JPG, PDF, ETC.).

CSS/HTML:
-Create your own mini web site (at least 3 pages), using css to complete the following on each page:
— 1. place background image,
— 2. Use the “box model”
— 3. Use pseudo classes
— 4. Include Declaration and metatags (refresh and redirect)
– CSS: Play with CSS rules and box model attributes.
– CSS: Practice text attributes. In particular, I want to see the @font-face
– Create a 3 column web page using CSS
– Practice- create tables and try all the attributes in Ch. 6
– Practice styling Forms
– Practice modifying Cursors
– Practice opacity, Z-index, drop down menu using lists.
– Practice – Image alignment
– Practice – Roll-overs and sprites
– Practice all HTML5 elements in Chapter 17

READING:
HTML5
The old
The new
What about those older browsers?
CSS magic

ASSIGNMENT:
Review 17
Practice all HTML5 elements in Chapter 17 (use code and images)
Read Ch 19 – SEO
Work on your final PROJECT!!
Purchase a domain name and hosting. Many options

CE 2411 07: Images – 07/21/14

INTRO
Practice- create tables and try all the attributes in Ch. 6
Practice styling Forms
Practice modifying Cursors
Practice opacity, Z-index, drop down menu using lists.

READING
Adding images is easy
Review

and title=””
Sizes in CSS
Alignment
Centering
All the different background image insertions
Rollovers and all their parts
Put it all together

ASSIGNMENT
Review 5, 16
Practice – Image alignment
Practice – Roll-overs and sprites
Final Design: Work on the final changes to your interface. Start working on your final Project.
Read Ch 17, 18

CE 2411 06: TABLES AND LAYOUT – 07/14/14

INTRO:
Review HW – Problems only. We will not be reviewing individual HW today.

READING:
Basic structure
Headings
Spanning columns and rows
Long Tables
Oldies but goodies
Ch. 14
List styles
List images
List positioning and shorthand
Table Properties
Even the Cursor can change
Ch 15
960.gs
z-index, and some examples of opacity, z-index and lists in drop down menus
3 columns

ASSIGNMENT:
Review 6, 14, 15
Practice- create tables and try all the attributes in Ch. 6
Practice styling Forms
Practice modifying Cursors
Practice opacity, Z-index, drop down menu using lists.
Read Chapter: 5, 16